CGC Conference

 (Super)Natural 

17th Annual Communication Graduate Caucus Conference

February 28 – March 1, 2022 | Virtual and Synchronous via Zoom – Carleton University

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Deadline for Submissions: December 17th, 2021

The 2022 conference theme imagines us as mediums, communicating with entities beyond our perception and expanding our senses into unknown spaces. Let us explore the Othered voices that haunt and disrupt the words of Western theoretical canons and the bellowing ghosts of fraught histories. Consider the enchantments of the internet and how we can illuminate the demons from the darkest corners of the digital network. And what makes something science fiction versus supernatural? Where is the divide between the paranormal and science, and how do we decide what is considered a “natural” part of the scientific world? How does the (super)natural world itself work towards influencing our perceptions? Beyond the spooky, we invite intersectional discussion around communication within the natural world, and how it is supported and extended by technology and media. We strive to understand the infrastructures and their impacts on the environment and non-human beings, but also human nature itself. We understand the terms “nature” and “natural” broadly, but how does communication extend/ contend with the natural? We stand in a moment where the past and the present are colliding. Stretching and making flexible historically fixed objects might prove productive in order to generate new articulations of the future. 

For any questions, please contact the conference committee at: cgcconference2022@gmail.com





TRANSITIONING: March 22 -23 | 2021
Virtual – Carleton University

TRANSITIONING

16th Annual Communication Graduate Caucus Conference
March 22-24, 2021 | Carleton University, Ottawa, ON

Keep in touch: @conference2021

The 2021 conference theme, TRANSITIONING, encourages submissions that address the changing nature of our social, political, and geographical circumstances. Amidst a global pandemic, adaptability has become an integral skill. We have seen global human rights movements call for the concrete social and institutional change of political, judicial, and economic bodies. Long-term debates regarding the need to transition or adapt are particularly poignant today. Environmental and climate activists draw attention to the urgent need for energy and resource transitions; greater attention is being called towards long-standing demands from BIPOC communities for institutional transformation and system reform; and finally, the COVID pandemic has called greater attention toward the inequitable living and working circumstances of Canadians across the country, from issues of food and resource access to redefining the kinds of work that are considered “essential.” While these limitations expose new challenges to our lived realities, they also offer the opportunity to rethink the institutions, tools, expectations, and forms of knowledge that organize work and life. The transitional nature of our reality is rendered especially pervasive in this climate.

This conference invites exploration of the above themes. We are particularly interested in research that broadens understandings of labour, human rights, and communication and media practices in a transitional context. We invite intersectional perspectives that challenge dominant, and perhaps even stagnant, Western ideologies using bodies of knowledge that have been ignored or made invisible throughout history.

TRANSITIONING, is pleased to announce that this year’s conference will include two keynote speakers: David Neiborg from the University of Toronto, and Paul Taylor of FoodShare Toronto. 

  • David B. Nieborg is an Assistant Professor of Media Studies in the Department of Arts, Culture and Media at University of Toronto Scarborough. He holds a PhD in Media Studies from the University of Amsterdam. Dr. Nieborg has published on the game industry, apps and platform economics, and games journalism. Currently, he is working on a co-authored book ‘Platforms, Power, and Cultural Production’ (Polity, 2020). 
  • Paul Taylor is the executive director of FoodShare Toronto, one of Canada’s largest food security organizations. Growing up materially poor in Toronto, Paul has spent his life working to eliminate poverty, fighting for workers’ rights, and standing up for the most marginalized.

Part of the FPA Research Series Winter 2021 – #FPAResearchSeries

Blue Dong, Britt Greening, Holly Tyson & Maddy Warlow
2020-2021 CGC Conference Co-Chairs, Carleton University
cgctransitioningconference2021@gmail.com

About the CGC Conference

Hosted at Carleton University in Ottawa, the CGC Conference is one of the longest running graduate conferences in Canada, attracting student researchers of all disciplines from across the country. The theme of the conference varies year-to-year to accommodate a variety of topics related to the field of communications. Past conference keynote speakers include:

Watch Dr. Mia Consalvo’s 2016 keynote:

Watch Dr. Kate Crawford’s 2015 keynote:
Watch Dr. Jack Halberstam’s 2014 keynote: